NC Student Aid Study Group

 

Strengthening North Carolina’s Need-Based State Grant Programs
to Support Student Success

 

A REPORT FROM THE JOINT STEERING COMMITTEE OF THE
NORTH CAROLINA STUDENT AID STUDY GROUP

 

Links to Appendices

 

Financial aid can be one of our most effective tools to get more students to and through postsecondary education, but grant programs must be designed and delivered in ways that align with these goals.

In the report, Strengthening North Carolina’s Need-Based State Grant Programs to Support Student Success, you’ll find recommendations and a summary of the study group’s findings.

To move from recommendations to action will require continued refinement of these ideas, detailed policy development, and engagement with state policymakers.

 

Peter Hans

President, North Carolina Community College System
Co-chair, North Carolina Student Aid Study Group

 

Margaret Spellings

President Emerita, University of North Carolina System
Co-chair, North Carolina Student Aid Study Group

 

 

The North Carolina Student Aid Study Group, a joint effort of the University of North Carolina and the North Carolina Community College System, brought together higher education leaders, financial aid officers, and state policymakers to take a close look at the financial aid programs that serve the UNC System and NCCCS students. Between August 2018 and January 2019, the group took a close look at the primary state grant programs that serve public college students in North Carolina: the UNC Need-based Grant, Community College Grant, and Education Lottery Scholarship. Over the course of 7 months, the group assessed the strengths and weaknesses of North Carolina’s grant programs, heard from national experts about the lessons North Carolina can learn from research and experience in other states, and developed evidence-based reforms to enhance the effectiveness of state aid investments.

 

Charge

Goals, Principles, Key Questions.

Briefs

PDF Downloads

Study Group

Chairs and Representatives

Progress

Meeting Materials

 

Navigation Icon Charge

While these programs are central to the state’s commitment to college affordability, their design reflects the era in which they were first implemented, when the primary goal was to lower the tuition that a student has to pay.

Today, we know much more about how the design and delivery of student aid can influence college aspirations, enrollment decisions, and student success once enrolled in college. We also know that particular design features--like complicated application processes, poor timing, and insufficient flexibility--can work at cross-purposes to the goals of financial aid programs.

Meanwhile, both of our systems have new strategic plans that set aggressive goals for student access and success. The UNC System aspires to increase the number of low-income and rural students who earn a degree and to increase graduation rates overall. The community college system has called for an increase in completion rates, better promotion of community college opportunities, and a rethinking of the process by which students apply to and enroll in their institutions.

Student aid can be a key tool in our efforts to accomplish these new goals, but only if our programs are well-suited to the challenge. As such, now is an opportune time to assess the strengths and weaknesses of our current approach to state-based aid and to identify evidence-based changes that can increase the productivity of those investments.

Are our grant programs designed to maximize access and success for all UNC System and community college students? How do students and families learn about these opportunities, and can the state do more to reach back into the K-12 pipeline to inform students about their options? Do the programs create incentives for timely degree completion? Are they designed to meet the needs of nontraditional students?

 

North Carolina Student Aid Study Group Charge

Adopted 9.10.18

 

Preamble

The state of North Carolina invests hundreds of millions of dollars in student aid each year in service of its constitutional mandate to provide higher education “as free as practicable.” These investments help ensure that the price of attendance will not be a barrier to college enrollment and completion for qualified North Carolinians of all ages.

As the UNC System and North Carolina Community College System work to build from this strong foundation, both institutions are intensely focused on increasing postsecondary access and success. The centrality of those priorities is reflected in both systems’ strategic plans which emphasize increases in completion rates, improved access for key groups, and smoother transitions from K-12 to college.

Student aid is an essential tool in our pursuit of these goals. But to meet the challenge, our state aid programs must adapt. A growing body of research has provided many lessons on how student aid design and delivery can influence college aspirations, enrollment decisions, and student success once enrolled in college. We also know that particular design features--like complicated application processes, poor timing, and insufficient flexibility--can weaken and ultimately undermine the goals of financial aid programs.

As such, it is an opportune time to assess the strengths and weaknesses of our current approach to state-based aid, and to identify evidence-based changes that can increase the productivity of those investments and their transformative impact for students.

The North Carolina Student Aid Study Group will bring together higher education leaders, financial aid experts, and state policymakers to take a close look at the aid programs that serve UNC and NCCCS students (the UNC Need-based Grant, Community College Grant, and Education Lottery Scholarship), identify lessons from research and other states about the optimal design of student aid, and develop evidence-based reforms to enhance the effectiveness of state aid investments.

 

Goals

  1. Conduct a detailed assessment of the strengths, weaknesses, and opportunities for improvement in existing state student aid programs and outreach efforts in the context of new goals and economic conditions.
  2. Examine lessons from rigorous research and from other states about the effective design and targeting of student aid programs and associated outreach efforts.
  3. Use the findings from 1 and 2 to develop a set of evidence-based reforms that can increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the state financial aid programs and outreach efforts that serve UNC System and NCCCS students.

 

Principles

  1. Student aid programs should be as simple, predictable, and transparent as possible to the end users.
  2. The state should work to ensure that prospective students and their families have opportunities to learn about student aid opportunities and postsecondary options early in their school careers.
  3. State aid should be targeted at those on whom it will have the largest effect on enrollment and success.
  4. State aid rules and procedures should encourage student progress and timely degree completion without compromising access.
  5. State aid rules and procedures should provide sufficient flexibility to serve the needs of different types of students.
  6. Potential reforms should focus primarily on making the most productive use of existing state investments.

 

Key Questions

  • Are our grant programs designed to maximize access and success for all UNC and community college students?
  • How do students and families learn about these opportunities, and can the state do more to reach back into the K-12 pipeline to inform students about their options?
  • Do the programs create incentives for timely degree completion?
  • Are our student aid programs designed to meet the needs of nontraditional students?

 

Navigation Icon Policy Briefs

  (PDF downloads)

Baum Policy Brief

Gurantz Policy Brief

Richburg-Hayes Policy Brief

SHEEO Policy Brief

 

NC Student Aid Study Group

 

Co-chairs

Peter Hans, President, North Carolina Community College System

Margaret Spellings, President, UNC System

 

UNC System Representatives

Darrell Allison, UNC Board of Governors

Sandy Baum, Urban Institute

Imani Burwell, Advisor at Warren County High School, Carolina Advising Corps, UNC-Chapel Hill

Chancellor Philip Dubois, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Rachelle Feldman, Associate Provost, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Louis Hunt, Senior Vice Provost, NC State University

Sharon Oliver, Director of Financial Aid, North Carolina Central University

Robert Rucho, UNC Board of Governors

Deborah Tollefson, Director of Financial Aid, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

NC Community College System Representatives

Kali Brown, Director of Financial Aid, Vance-Granville Community College

Pamela Harrell, VP for Student Services, Johnston Community College

Rosemary Kelly, AVP for Student Services, Fayetteville Technical Community College

Dennis King, President, Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College

Lisa Koretoff, Director of Financial Aid, Guilford Technical Community College

Laura Leatherwood, President, Blue Ridge Community College

Daniel “JJ” McEachern, Dean of Enrollment Management, Central Piedmont Community College

Christopher Sabin, Director of Veterans Programs, Coastal Carolina Community College

Chad Williams, VP for Student Services, Randolph Community College

 

NCSEAA Representative

Elizabeth McDuffie, Executive Director, North Carolina State Educational Assistance Authority (NCSEAA)

 

 

Navigation Icon Progress

During five in-person meetings, the Study Group focused on content areas reinforced by findings from a survey of financial aid directors at UNC and NCCS institutions. (See Appendix A.) Financial Aid Study Group team members worked in Groups:

  • Targeting, predictability and simplicity
  • Outreach and accessibility
  • Optimizing aid for student success
  • Supporting non-traditional students

 

Timeline

 

Sep 2018

September 10, 2018: Overview of existing NC programs

Meeting Materials

Agenda

Meeting Briefing Book

The National Context for Student Aid Reform
Sandy Baum, Fellow, Education Policy Program, Urban Institute

Financial Aid 101
Elizabeth McDuffie, Executive Director, North Carolina State Educational Assistance Authority (NCSEAA)

2019 Financial Aid Processing Calendar

Consolidated Notes on 9/10 NC Student Aid Study Group Discussion

How Students Use Federal, State and Institutional Aid to Pay for College
Molly Sarubbi and Sarah Pingel | Education Commission of the United States

REDESIGNING STATE FINANCIAL AID: Principles to Guide State Aid Policymaking
Sarah Pingel, Brian A. Sponsler, and Neal Holly | Education Commission of the United States

Lessons learned from a data-driven college access program: The National College Advising Corps
Eileen L. Horng

Students on the Margins
Chronicle of Higher Education

Analysis of North Carolina Financial Aid Programs: National Comparisons, Trends, Survey Results
HCM Strategists

The Effectiveness of Student Aid Policies: What the Research Tells Us

Incentives and Services for College Achievement: Evidence from a Randomized Trial
Joshua Angrist

BEYOND NEED AND MERIT: Strengthening State Grant Programs
Brookings Institution State Grant Aid Study Group

Financial Aid Policy: Lessons from Research
Susan Dynarski and Judith Scott-Clayton

Increasing Community College Completion Rates among Low-Income Students: Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluation of a Case Management Intervention
William N. Evans, Melissa S. Kearney, Brendan C. Perry, and James X. Sullivan

Sources of Postsecondary Funding and Implications for Low-Income Students
Nate Johnson

Oct 2018

October 10, 2018

Targeting, Predictability & Simplicity;
Outreach & Accessibility

Meeting Materials

Agenda

Improving Outreach and Accessibility of Financial Aid
Improving Outreach and Accessibility of Financial Aid (Presentation)

Dr. Oded Gurantz, Truman School of Public Affairs | University of Missouri

A Look at State-level Outreach Efforts in North Carolina
Mark Wiles, Director, CFNC Pathways, College Foundation of North Carolina

Improving Targeting, Predictability, and Simplicity
Sandy Baum, Fellow, Education Policy Program, Urban Institute

What Students and Parents Need: Early Information about Paying for College
Steven Brooks, Executive Director | NC State Education Assistance Authority

Oct 2018

October 31, 2018

Optimizing Aid for Student Success
Supporting Non-Traditional Students

Meeting Materials

Agenda

Nov 2018

November 28, 2018

Review of draft recommendations
Technical analysis framework

Meeting Materials

Agenda

Group C: Optimizing Aid for Student Success
Group D: Support for Non-Traditional Students
Group A: Targeting, Predictability, and Simplicity (updates)
Group B: Outreach and Accessibility (updates)

DRAFT RECOMMENDATIONS 11/28/18

 

 

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