UNC senior Maggie Hildebran poses for a portrait on Polk Place on November 19, 2018, on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (Johnny Andrews/UNC-Chapel Hill)

She is Carolina’s 18th Marshall Scholar, and was one of only 32 recipients of the two-year Marshall award.

Maggie Hilderbran, a fourth-year undergraduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has been named a recipient of the Marshall Scholarship, a graduate studies scholarship to study at up to two United Kingdom institutions, in any field of study.

Maggie is one of 40 Americans selected for the one- and two-year awards, which provide university fees, cost of living expenses, annual book grants, thesis grant, research and daily travel grants and fares to and from the United States, an average award of £35,000 per year. She is Carolina’s 18th Marshall Scholar, and was one of only 32 recipients of the two-year Marshall award.

“I’m honored to have been selected for a Marshall Scholarship,” Hilderbran said. “It’s thrilling to know that for the next two years I’ll have the opportunity to dig deeper into my fields of study, work closely with others who share my academic interests, and experience Scottish and English culture. I especially appreciate the support I’ve received from my professors and from the Office of Distinguished Scholarships, which helped me realize this dream. I’m excited to have the honor of representing Carolina in the UK for the next two years.”

Hilderbran, 22, is the daughter of Gregory and Carole Hilderbran and is from Asheville, North Carolina. She is a 2015 graduate of Carolina Day School and plans to graduate from Carolina this May with a double major in physics (with a concentration in astrophysics) and religious studies, along with a minor in history.

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Originally published Dec. 6, 2018.

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