Since it launched in 2011 with funding from Novant Health, the Rams Know H.O.W. mobile clinic has served nearly 10,000 uninsured or underinsured residents.

Winston-Salem State University’s (WSSU) mobile clinic has expanded its services and hours thanks to a $170,294 grant from the Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust.

Starting in January, the Rams Know H.O.W. Mobile Clinic, a service of WSSU’s Center of Excellence for the Elimination of Health Disparities (CEEHD), began offering free expanded clinical services, including medical services; school and work physicals; some vaccinations; STD/STI screenings; pregnancy screenings; and behavioral health screening and counseling. In addition, services will now be offered four days per week at various locations in East Winston.

The expansion is made possible through a partnership between WSSU, United Health Centers and Southside Discount Pharmacy, said Dr. Melicia Whitt-Glover, executive director of CEEHD.

Aaron Jackson, mobile clinic coordinator, handles clinic scheduling and day-to-day operations.

“We have seen a tremendous growth in requests for the services from our mobile clinic,” Jackson said. “We are delighted that we will be able to expand the services our faculty, staff and students provide to the communities in East Winston and help to strengthen our efforts in the fight against chronic illnesses and diseases that are impacting the communities surrounding WSSU.”

Since it launched in 2011 with funding from Novant Health, the Rams Know H.O.W. mobile clinic, the only HBCU-based mobile clinic in the nation, has served nearly 10,000 uninsured or underinsured residents. Services are provided by faculty, staff and students.

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Originally published February 2, 2018.

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