News

Sanders Elected Secretary of the UNC Board of Governors

June 8, 2007

For more information contact Joni Worthington at (919) 962-4629 or worthj@northcarolina.edu

June 8, 2007

FOR RELEASE AT WILL

Sanders Elected Secretary of the University of North Carolina Board of Governors

CHAPEL HILL –Estelle “Bunny” Sanders, mayor of the town of Roper, was elected by acclamation today (June 8) as secretary of the UNC Board of Governors, the policy-making body of the 16-campus University of North Carolina.  She was tapped to complete a two-year term begun by Patsy Perry of Durham, who will retire from the board on June 30.  Sanders will serve through June 30, 2008.

First elected to the Board of Governors in 2003, Sanders is former director of the Elizabeth City State University Small Business and Technology Development Center.  In addition to her service as mayor, she has also served on the Washington County Child Advocacy Board, the Gateway Bank Advisory Board, the Washington County Travel and Tourism Board, and the Washington County Hospital Board.  Currently a member of the Board of Governors’ Committee on Educational Planning, Policies, and Programs and vice-chair of its Public Affairs Committee,  Sanders has also served on several ad hoc board committees, including the Committee on Economic Development and the University.   She holds an undergraduate degree in political science from Howard University and has pursued graduate studies at George Washington University.

The oldest public university in the nation, the University of North Carolina enrolls more than 202,000 students and encompasses all 16 of North Carolina’s public institutions that grant baccalaureate degrees.  UNC campuses support a broad array of distinguished liberal-arts programs, two medical schools and one teaching hospital, two law schools, a veterinary school, a school of pharmacy, 11 nursing programs, 15 schools of education, three schools of engineering, and a specialized school for performing artists.  Also under the University umbrella are the UNC Center for Public Television with its 11-station statewide broadcast network, and the NC School of Science and Mathematics, the nation’s first public residential high school for gifted students.